FREEMAN

Tomgirl and ladyboy, I feel like there’s not too much of a difference.

They’re synonymous. For me it’s like, if you’re a drag queen you’re putting on makeup because you’re performing. You’re wearing like, actual boobs and padding, and stuff you know? As a ladyboy, you’re just wearing [within your own] boundaries in your clothing and in the way you carry yourself, and your hair and that’s the difference to me. It’s more like a lifestyle. 

I FORGET I EVEN HAVE MAKEUP ON, AND I DON’T EVEN KNOW. 


Then you walk into a grocery store and people are like, woah! Like the Lyft driver on the way here, he was staring at me. It’s not something that they’re used to seeing. You know? And that’s why it’s so important to me to make sure that we’re known. I grew up always being like, super feminine, it’s just like who I am. It wasn’t until probably like, freshman year of college that I started wearing makeup. 

To answer [the] question why I started wearing makeup, I was very insecure. And it was just something to kind of like, build and hide over. It was like a wall. 

Luckily for me a lot of my friends are professional makeup artists and they were always giving me tips, and brushes, and stuff. So it’s lucky I’ve always had a good support system. 

I think a lot of it [makeup] started from the negative attention I got from men. Believe it or not, men are very attracted to it. All kinds of men. 

It’s all in perception.

I could definitely see [in other parts of the world] a ladyboy as being a transgender person. But I just got into it as more of an androgyny thing, and I consider myself androgynous. I just like to call myself a ladyboy, I think it’s more of a fun term. 

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